Credit: Use It to Build It (Part 2)

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As discussed in Credit: Use It To Build It -Part 1, it is essential to qualify for and properly use credit in order to have credit. A thin credit file does little good to help one build or rebuild credit. Thin credit is described as a file lacking in length and depth of credit history. Thin is not a good thing in the credit sense.

The length of a credit history is a matter of time. A short credit history may have accounts that have been open for a matter of months or one or two years. A long credit history may span decades because open, active accounts remain indefinitely.

The depth of a credit report is an issue of the number and types of accounts you have. A credit history with only one or two accounts will likely be considered thin, even if it spans many years. A “thick” file would have several accounts of different types. For example a credit history could include credit cards, installment loans and a mortgage.

The Basics

Let’s start with the basics, understand the mechanics of the FICO Pie Chart as well as the art and science of Rebuilding Your Scores. Credit scores are not a big mystery; they are simply a measure of the information reported to the credit reporting agencies by your creditors. Learn about your credit reports control that which you can as to what is reported and your credit scores will follow.

Credit Score Facts

On credit scores, how do they work? What you can do to raise your scores is discussed in this blog. It is necessary to understand there is a difference in the credit scores one may obtain for free via the Internet. These are not the scores used by lenders. They may not even be close to those used by lenders. In this blog we discuss the difference between what we call FICO or FAKO Scores?

Join a Credit Union

Not just any credit union will do. Some credit unions are so large they act more like a bank than a credit union. To learn a little more about credit unions and to find one you can join, read our blog titled: Credit Union Power. This is a key step to reestablishing your credit. Once you’ve become a member, ask for help to set up a $500 secured installment loan. Next, utilizing some of your savings, as much as possible, set up a secured credit card account and use it properly.

Beginning Anew or New?

Whether beginning from scratch as a young person with no credit or whether starting again, the tasks are quite similar. Read through both Part 1 and Part 2 of these blogs to learn more of what to do and not do as you begin this new journey. If you have a family member with excellent credit, read and share this blog on this which we call inherited credit. You have the opportunity to learn about how it works and how it doesn’t work.

Credit Utilization

Anyone who uses credit cards could have high utilization, particularly those which pay off their balances in full each month. This is because balances are often reported to the credit bureaus mid-billing cycle. So if you have a $5,000 limit and you charge $4,000 in a month, you could be reportedly utilizing 80% of your available credit. The result is most often dramatically reduced FICO™ Scores.

We wish you success!

Image attrbution

Financially Speaking  James Spray, MLO, CNE, FICO Pro
CO LMO 100008715 | NMLS 257365 | September 21, 2014
 
Notice: The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only. You may use this information in whole and not in part providing you give full attribution to James Spray.

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