Timeline: Bankruptcy to Mortgage Chart

Experiencing a severe credit event such as foreclosure, short-sale, deed-in-lieu of foreclosure or bankruptcy does not mean you will never be eligible to get a home loan. This chart provides the time-out periods required by event. The assumptions are that you have established acceptable credit scores and meet underwriting guidelines. In certain circumstances, one may qualify for a mortgage upon discharge of a Chapter 7 or during a Chapter 13.

Financially Speaking™ James Spray RMLO, CNE, FICO Pro | CO LMO 100008715 | NMLS 257365 | Originally published in 2010 and updated regularly | September 19, 2017 Contact me to obtain a pdf copy of this chart.

Notice: The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct for your situation. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only. You may reproduce this information in whole and not in part, providing you give full attribution to James Spray.

National Elder Abuse Resources and Colorado Financial Elder Abuse Mandatory Reporting Law

Elderly folks tend to be more trusting and less informed of the latest scams, making them the perfect target. To learn more about elder abuse, on the national level, two great resources are the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the National Center on Elder Abuse.

In Colorado, there is the Colorado Coalition for Elder Rights and Abuse Prevention.

As well, Colorado has a mandatory reporting law (including financial abuse) for certain categories of professionals and other workers.

Sadly, it is all too common where a family member is committing financial abuse of a parent, grandparent or other senior family member.

While it is encouraged that reporters of elder financial abuse contact local law enforcement, we’ve learned many local law enforcement agencies are unaware of the Colorado financial elder abuse law and are not trained on how to deal with it.

To report elder abuse in Colorado, the first option is to contact the Adult Protective Services (APS) intake office within the county department of human services were the at-risk adult lives. Click anywhere in this sentence for a current list of phone numbers to report elder abuse.

If reporting to the county APS office is not a viable option, contact the District Attorney’s office for the county in which the at-risk adult lives.

Image attribution

Financially Speaking™ James Spray RMLO, CNE, FICO Pro | CO LMO 100008715 | NMLS 257365 |August 26, 2017

Notice: The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only. You may use this information in whole and not in part providing you give full attribution to James Spray.

Obsessives Have Cracked the Perfect FICO Credit Score of 850 – Bloomberg

Kudos to Suzanne Woolley for authoring an article which accurately portrays how one can improve their credit.

Source: Obsessives Have Cracked the Perfect FICO Credit Score of 850 – Bloomberg

Do you prefer a ReLOC or HELOC? – Tools for Retirement Planning

Tom Davidson has written and illustrated another great article which I know you will enjoy reading. Here are the first few paragraphs which lead into the link to his wonderful presentation:

“HELOCs (Home Equity Lines of Credit) are widely used. Simply having one makes many people more comfortable. My wife and I had a standby HELOC for many years – ready to use as a convenience or in an emergency. Luckily that emergency never happened, but we felt well prepared knowing we had ready access to a substantial amount of cash that could be used for anything we needed. When I was a financial advisor, a HELOC was on my checklist to discuss with every client – at least those who were prudent with their money.

ReLOC: A Retirees Line of Credit

Is there a better alternative for homeowners over age 62?  A ReLOC may be a far better choice for many retirees. ReLOC is a nickname that stands for either Retirees Line oCredit or Reverse Mortgage Line of Credit. While ReLOCs share many features with HELOCs, three unique features make a ReLOC a line of credit designed for retirees:

  1. The amount you can access grows every month
  2. You don’t have to make payments until you permanently leave your home
  3. The loan can’t be canceled, reduced, or frozen as long as you keep up with basic mortgage obligations (property tax, homeowner’s insurance, basic maintenance, and Homeowner’s Association dues).

Here’s the borrowing limits for a ReLOC and a HELOC for a 63-year-old in a $400,000 house who lives to age 99:”

Source: Do you prefer a ReLOC or HELOC? – Tools for Retirement Planning

Reverse Mortgages For Every Income Bracket

In the terrific, brief article posted below, wealth manager Tom Davison provides clear understanding of the usefulness for reverse mortgages in every income bracket.

I encourage everyone with any interest whatsoever in wealth management to invest a few minutes and read Davison’s great blog post, reblogged below.

Reverse Mortgages: Many Users, Many Uses

Image attribution: Tools for Retirement Planning

Notice: The information provided is not intended to be an indication of loan approval or a commitment to lend. Additional program guidelines may apply. Information is subject to change without notice.

Disclaimer: This article does not represent that any of the information provided is approved by HUD or FHA or any US Government Agency.

Financially Speaking™ James Spray RMLO, CNE, FICO Pro | CO LMO 100008715 | NMLS 257365 | June 21, 2017

The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only.

Do Credit Markets Watch the Waving Flag of Bankruptcy?   Liberty Street Economics

Personal bankruptcy is surprisingly common in the United States. Almost 15 percent of the U.S. population has filed for bankruptcy sometime over the past twenty-five years, based on my calculations using the New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax (CCP). In 2015, roughly 800,000 debtors filed for bankruptcy, according to court records, representing 0.64 percent of U.S. households. One of the consequences for filers is a mark on their credit report—a bankruptcy “flag”—which indicates that the consumer has filed for bankruptcy.

This bankruptcy flag is visible to creditors and, according to the credit bureaus, hurts filers’ credit scores. To limit these effects, the Fair Credit Reporting Act restricts the length of time that credit bureaus can fly these flags on reports for each (personal) bankruptcy chapter: the flag for Chapter 7—in which debtors get a full discharge of (unsecured) debts after unprotected (non-exempt) assets are liquidated—must be removed after ten years, while the flag for Chapter 13—a partial debt repayment bankruptcy designed to help people keep their homes—is typically removed after seven years. For economists, the fixed timing of the flag removal (and the difference across bankruptcy chapters) gives us a laboratory to explore how the lifting of bankruptcy flags affects borrowers’ credit scores and credit outcomes, by comparing these outcomes directly before and after flag removal…

Source: Do Credit Markets Watch the Waving Flag of Bankruptcy?   Liberty Street Economics

Realtors: 2 Deals In 1 – The Purchase Reverse Mortgage

Back to Back Closings

Back to Back Closings

Realtors: 2 Deals In 1 – The Purchase Reverse Mortgage

The Home Equity Conversion Mortgage for Purchase (HECM) is known in the industry as the H4P. The H4P is an FHA Insured reverse mortgage which is guaranteed by the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

In writing this post I recall a specific H4P transaction where I was privileged to originate a purchase reverse mortgage for a delightful fellow Colorado native. This transaction closed in July 2013. The purchaser, age 63, sold her townhome in Parker for $115,000.00 and in conjunction with the H4P used the combined proceeds to purchase a townhome in Castle Rock for $227,600.00.

The financial details of that transaction are as follows: The buyer’s cash to close requirement was $96,400.00 plus her earnest money of $2,000.00. This sum of $98,600.00 included pro-rata property taxes, insurance and HOA fees.  The H4P proceeds to close were $129,200.00. In addition, the FHA UFMIP, origination fee and allowed closing costs totaling $11,400.00 were financed. All figures have been rounded to the nearest $50.00.

Purchase Price $227,600.00
Buyer Cash to Close + Earnest Money     98,400.00
H4P Cash at Closing $129,200.00
Financed Closing Costs     11,400.00

She found it most desirable to purchase her new home and not have to make mortgage payments ever again. Of course, she may make periodic payments or payoff the loan at any time but only if she wishes. It bears observing that she made this decision with the blessing of her children, one of whom is a CPA. Going forward, she simply pays the taxes, insurance and HOA dues. She does not need to pay monthly mortgage payments again for so long as she lives in her home.

On qualifying, for all intents and purposes, this was a Stated Income loan. As a matter of responsible underwriting, it was merely confirmed she had sufficient income to pay real estate taxes, insurance and HOA dues.

Due to adjustments* which FHA made to the HECM program in September 2013, an identical transaction as described in this post would presently require cash to close from the buyer of approximately $114,950.00.

On qualifying, for all intents and purposes, this was a Stated Income loan. As a matter of responsible underwriting, it was merely confirmed she had sufficient income to pay real estate taxes, insurance and HOA dues.

Due to adjustments* which FHA made to the HECM program in September 2013, an identical transaction as described in this post would presently require cash to close from the buyer of approximately $114,950.00.

For additional facts on the FHA Reverse Mortgage program (HECM), you may wish to click on this link: Reverse Mortgage Facts. Further discussion and illustration on the H4P is available on this link: What Is A Purchase Reverse Mortgage?

TIPS: There are no concessions allowed by sellers, builders or agents; this includes any personal property (such as appliances). In addition, the buyer must pay for the title insurance. There can be no repair set-asides; all repairs, where major property deficiencies threaten the health and safety of the homeowner and/or jeopardize the soundness and security of the property, must be completed by the seller prior to closing. Another unique feature of this program is to set your closings for about 10:00 AM and not later than 11:00 AM to help make sure the H4P funds the same day as the closing. On the closer, few are experienced with the H4P, most are experienced with the traditional reverse mortgage and think the H4P is the same. It is not. Given the buyer is paying for the title insurance, I suggest we use a closer well-trained in the HP. I have such a closer.

Finally, although a rare circumstance, should a buyer have two FHA Case Numbers open, the non-purchase case number must be cancelled prior to final loan approval. As of this post, FHA will not allow an application to be taken until the Certificate of Occupancy has been issued.

If a non-borrowing spouse is involved in the transaction, the non-borrowing spouse (NBS) may not be a party to the real estate purchase contract. For more information on the NBS you may wish to read: Reverse Mortgages and the Under-Age 62 Spouse.

[*HUD Mortgagee Letter 2013-27]

Update: There are market and borrower favorable changes pending application to the H4P on September 19, 2017. When they go into effect, this posting will be updated to reflect the changes.

Notice: The information provided is not intended to be an indication of loan approval or a commitment to lend. Additional program guidelines may apply. Information is subject to change without notice.

Disclaimer: This article does not represent that any of the information provided is approved by HUD or FHA or any US Government Agency.

Image attribution

 Financially Speaking  James Spray, RMLOCNE, FICO Pro |CO LMO 100008715 / NMLS 257365 |Published: April 3, 2014 ~ Updated: February 6, 2017

 Notice: The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to compose and link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only. You may use this information in whole and not in part providing you give full attribution to James Spray.