Experian ‘Boost’ Adds a New Way to Strengthen Your Credit

The idea is to help thin-file customers — those who have less experience with credit — by incorporating signs of responsible financial behavior that traditionally aren’t seen by credit reporting bureaus. Boost also may help people who are rebuilding their credit after financial setbacks. Experian estimates the product could affect up to 100 million consumers’ scores.

Consumers who want to use Boost must allow the product to scan their bank account transactions to identify utility and cell phone payments. Information about payments will appear in their Experian credit report and be used when certain credit scores are calculated from that data.

Boost will count only positive payment history, Experian says, so missed utility or cell phone payments will not hurt your score. That’s different from how credit scores usually work, where late or missed payments are recorded in your credit report and can reduce your score.

Consumers can register on Experian’s website to get early access to Boost, and the product will roll out more widely in early 2019, the bureau said in a news release…” http://bit.ly/2V1nq9P

Image Credit

Financially Speaking™ James Spray RMLO, CNE, FICO Pro | CO LMO 100008715 | NMLS 257365 | December 20, 2018

Notice: The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct for your situation. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only. You may reproduce this information in whole and not in part, providing you give full attribution to James Spray.

UltraFICO®An Initial Discussion

While this new alternative “credit” algorithm is not set to roll out until sometime in 2019, included below are my initial thoughts based on the BIAA press release and the below referenced articles from the Wall Street Journal, Consumer Affairs and USA Today.

Experian, FICO and Finicity Launch New Ultra FICO Credit Score

With Ultra FICO® Score, a consumer grants permission to contribute information from banking statements, including the length of time accounts have been open, frequency of activity, and evidence of saving, which can be electronically read by Finicity and combined with consumer credit information from Experian to provide an enhanced view of positive financial behavior.

Experian, FICO and Finicity estimate this new score has the potential to improve credit access for the majority of Americans and is particularly relevant for those who fall in the grey area in terms of credit scores (scores in the upper 500s to lower 600s) or fall just below a lender’s score cut-off. Consumers who are relatively new to credit with limited history or those with previous financial distress that are getting back on their feet stand to benefit the most.

This new system will roll out next year. Initially, the most likely use will be for beginner credit cards. The UltraFICO® is an add-on feature some lenders will offer to enhance a prospective borrowers credit profile and score.

The prospect must provide access for a one-time snapshot of their banking/bill paying account. The data analyzed will be regular payments of rent and utilities. The expected average balance in the account should be $400 or more. There should be no overdrafts or NSF checks in recent months. It’s expected there will be more income than outgo to the account. Discussed is that the checking/bill paying account must be established for some undefined time.

The above referenced WSJ article captures the essence of what the new credit score enhancing tool is expected to be. It will not, in the immediate future, be used by mortgage lenders. I expect that it may be used by some auto dealers.

UltraFICO® score takes into account how much money you have in the bank

According to the Journal report, the new UltraFICO® would be a tool for consumers whose credit scores are not that great. If they have a few hundred dollars in the bank and have had the bank account for a number of [undisclosed] years without overdrawing they might see their credit standing rise.

But in practice, the new formula is likely to be of greater benefit to consumers who already have high credit scores because they are the consumers most likely to have accumulated some cash in the bank. Consumers with low credit scores are often in that situation because they lack the extra cash to meet an unexpected expense.

Based on practicality and experience, I believe this Consumer Affairs writer is off-base in his analysis of who this will help the most. Someone with >760 FICO® Scores has no need for a bump of a few points whereas someone with a 620 score most definitely has the need. We’ll soon figure out just how many months one must have $400 or more in their account to gain the bump.

New FICO system could lift credit scores by including checking and savings history

Finally, from the above referenced article from USA Today: “...it remains to be seen how fast lenders will adopt this supplemental scoring system. For instance, FICO’s latest credit score – FICO 9 – was released four years ago, but the previous version of the score – FICO 8 – remains the most widely one used.

Consider the fact that neither FICO 8 or 9 are used in the mortgage lending industry. UltraFICO® may be used by certain credit card issuers as well as some vehicle lenders. We’ll know more next year.

Video Update 1/16/19

Image attribution

Financially Speaking™ James Spray RMLO, CNE, FICO Pro | CO LMO 100008715 | NMLS 257365 | October 29, 2018 | October 30, 2018

Notice: The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only. You may use this information in whole and not in part providing you give full attribution to James Spray.

What Are the Costs of Aging in Place?

According to an AARP study, 90 percent of people age 65 and over would prefer to stay in their own homes as they get older — and not go to a nursing home or assisted living facility.

But if you or your parents are buying, building or renovating a home to accommodate the needs of a loved one, what kind of costs can you expect to incur?

Source: What Are the Costs of Aging in Place?

Financially Speaking™ James Spray RMLO, CNE, FICO Pro | CO LMO 100008715 | NMLS 257365 | August 17, 2018

Notice: The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct for your situation. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only. You may reproduce this information in whole and not in part, providing you give full attribution to James Spray.

Free Credit/Security Freezes – All 3 Bureaus – Free Unfreezing

Thanks to a new federal law – the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act – consumers will be able to contact each of the three major credit reporting agencies and direct them to place a free freeze on the consumer’s credit file. By restricting access, a credit freeze makes it harder for identity thieves to open new accounts in consumers’ names.

Not only will it be free for consumers to freeze their credit, but they can lift that freeze for free, too. And the law requires the credit reporting agencies to do it in a hurry. If a consumer asks for a freeze online or by phone, the credit reporting agency has to put the freeze in place no later than the next business day. If the consumer wants to lift the freeze…that has to happen within an hour.

This new law is effective September 21, 2018. Click here for more.

The New York Times published good article on the subject. “Freezing Credit Will Now Be Free. Here’s Why You Should Go for It.https://nyti.ms/2Mw01rU

Financially Speaking™ James Spray RMLO, CNE, FICO Pro | CO LMO 100008715 | NMLS 257365 | August 16, 2018 | Updated September 16, 2018

Notice: The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only. You may use this information in whole and not in part providing you give full attribution to James Spray.

The State of Lending: Debt Settlement | Center for Responsible Lending

Debt settlement companies offer the promise of settling a consumer’s debt for a fraction of what they owe. The idea is simple: debt settlement companies offer to negotiate down the outstanding debt (usually from credit cards) owed to a more manageable amount so that a consumer can become debt free. Unfortunately debt settlement carries significant risks that may result in consumers becoming even worse off.

Debt settlement is inherently a risky venture: in order to enroll into debt settlement programs, consumers are required to default on their debt which often results in fees, increased interest rates, and sometimes even lawsuits from creditors. Even after assuming all this risk, consumers are offered no guarantees; in fact, some creditors refuse to negotiate with debt settlement companies at all. Even if a settlement is reached, a consumer unable to keep up with the new settlement arrangement risks falling back into default – and now without the fees paid to the debt settlement company for negotiating the agreement. CRL finds that consumers must settle at least two-thirds of the debt they enroll in a debt settlement program to benefit, a result that many will not achieve.

This chapter examines the debt settlement industry, the risks to consumers, and recommends actions at both the federal and state levels to reduce the potential harm to consumers.

The chapter finds:

  • Debt settlement is a risky strategy for debt reduction – and often leaves consumers more financially vulnerable.

  • Consumers must settle two-thirds of their debt to be better off than they were before – and many consumers are unlikely to reach that level of success.

  • Strong state and federal laws could curb risks associated with debt settlement.

Source: The State of Lending: Debt Settlement | Center for Responsible Lending

FHFA, FICO & Political Gibberish = Economic Risk

FHFA on credit score delivery: forgotten lessons

Multiple versions of a credit model may lead to added cost and complexity

  • While FHFA states that new scores provide “only marginal benefits,” they go on to say that there are “compelling reasons” to change. It is not clear how that conclusion is reached.

  • They ask market participants for cost estimates, and state that the GSEs will require 12-18 months to implement changes, but do not provide cost estimates for the Enterprises.

  • They acknowledge that there are risks associated with the proposed changes but do not provide a structure for ameliorating these concerns, or a cost estimate of implementing it.

  • They ignore the potential risks associated with the credit loosening implicit in the new VantageScore model that stem from more relaxed trade line histories and increases to systemic risks associated with its adoption by lightly-regulated nonbanks.

Source link

Financially Speaking™ James Spray RMLO, CNE, FICO Pro | CO LMO 100008715 | NMLS 257365 |April 30, 2018

Notice: The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct for your situation. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only. You may reproduce this information in whole and not in part, providing you give full attribution to James Spray.

JUMBO Reverse Mortgage Facts

JUMBO Reverse Mortgage Facts

  • Borrower(s) minimum age of 62
  • SFR and 2-unit properties – minimum loan amount $850,000.00
  • Condos valued over $500K – spot approval on a case-by-case basis if not FHA approved
  • Maximum loan amount is $4 million
  • No upfront or monthly mortgage insurance premium
  • Mandatory Counseling required – specified agencies only
  • Available for both refinance and purchase transactions
  • Financial Assessment underwrite performed on all applicants

Examples by Age and Purchase Price of the Proprietary Purchase Reverse Mortgage

SFR & 2-Unit | Purchase Price Age Down Payment HomeSafe® Proceeds
$ 850,000 (Min) 62 $ 589,594 $ 260,406
74      493,799      356,201
80      445,342      404,658
88      389,674      460,326
$4,000,000 (Max) 62 $2,841,978 $1,158,022
74 2,419,353 1,580,647
80 2,206,203 1,739,797
88 1,959,978 2,040,022
Condominium
$500,000 (Min) $4M (Max) 62 $ 372,490 $   127,510
74     316,140       183,860
80     287,720     212,280
88     254,890     245,110

These examples are for illustration purposes only.

  • The borrower(s) may retain up to four additional FINANCED properties
  • New-builds must have the Certificate of Occupancy issued prior to closing

This Proprietary Purchase Reverse Mortgage is not associated with the FHA reverse mortgage (HECM) program

NOTICE: This is not an offer to extend credit

Financially Speaking™ James Spray RMLO, CNE, FICO Pro | CO LMO 100008715 | NMLS 257365 | April 9, 2018 | Copyright 2018

Notice: The information on this blog is opinion and information. While I have made every effort to link accurate and complete information, I cannot guarantee it is correct. Please seek legal assistance to make certain your legal interpretation and decisions are correct for your situation. This information is not legal advice and is for guidance only. You may reproduce this information in whole and not in part, providing you give full attribution to James Spray.